Acupressure Massage for Angioneurotic Edema

Angioneurotic Edema:
Angioneurotic Edema:
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These are the acupressure points for angioneurotic edema. Working on these points can help you get better faster. You do not have to use all of these points. Using just one or two of them whenever you have a free hand can be effective.

Acupressure Point Thymus point
Location: beginning from the lower border of the supraclavicular fossa and extends to the upper border of the xyphoid process of the sternum.
Benefits: immune disorders, aids, low immunity, cancer, epstein-barr virus diseases, frequent colds, frequent viral infections, constant allergic reactions, long term sickness, chronic fatigue syndrome, blood disorders, leukemia, spleen disorders, platelet imbalance, immature blood cell production, bone marrow diseases.

Acupressure Point LU1 — Zhong Fu
Chinese Name: 中 府

Location: in the depression below the acromial extremity of the clavicle, 8 finger width lateral to the midline. On the outside edge of the rib cage, three finger-width below the clavicle.
Benefits: shortness of breath, upper respiratory disorders, cough, asthma, pain in the chest, pain in the shoulder and back, fullness in the chest, bronchitis, pneumonia, postnasal drip.

Acupressure Point K9 — Zhu Bin
Chinese Name: 築賓

Location: at the lower end of the muscle gastrocnemius in the medial aspect, 7 finger width above the tip of the medial malleolus.
Benefits: pain in the medial aspect of the leg, poor water metabolism, water retention, blood poisoning, help with kidney filtration, high creatinine in the blood, high urea nitrogen, high sodium intake, high blood pressure, venereal diseases, syphilis, chemical toxemia, mental fog, poor memory, manic disorders.

Acupressure Point SP9 — Yin Ling Quan
Chinese Name: 陰陵泉

Location: On the inside of the leg, under the kneecap in the hallow just below the bulge. on the lower border of the medial condyle of the knee bone (tibia), in the depression between the posterior border of the tibia and gastrocnemius muscle.
Benefits: abdominal distention, edema, water retention, incontinence of urine, difficulty urinating, not producing enough urine, kidney not able to filter enough urine, pain of the external genitalia, insomnia, painful intercourse, low libido in male or female.

Acupressure Point P6 — Nei Guan
Chinese Name: 內關

Location: three finger width above the wrist crease on the palmar side.
Benefits: palpitation, vomiting, mental disorders, chest pains-emotional and physical, nausea, to decrease appetite, to calm down, decrease panic attacks, to stop smoking, addictions to alcohol, food and drugs, poor memory, to promote yawning, side effects of radiation and chemotherapy.

Acupressure Point LI11 — Qu Chi
Chinese Name: 曲池

Location: On the top, outer end of the elbow crease. bend your arm, press your thumb into the hollow located on the top, outer end of the elbow crease, directly above the elbow, between the elbow joint (below) and the muscle (above).
Benefits: food allergy, hives, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery, fever, sore throat, pain in the elbow and arm, tennis elbow, to balance the energy in cancer patients. Relieves allergies, particularly inflamed skin disorders (such as hives and rashes), itching, and fevers.

Acupressure Point CV12 — Zhong Wan
Chinese Name: 中脘

Location: midway between the belly button and the bottom of the breastbone. On the midline of the abdomen, 5 finger width above the belly button.
Benefits: acute abdominal pain, pain due to overeating, gastric pain, sour stomach, belching, regurgitation, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery, distention of the abdomen due to flatulence, hiatal hernia.

Acupressure Point GB12 — Wan Gu
Chinese Name: 完骨

Location: in the depression below the mastoid process.
Benefits: headache, insomnia, pain and stiffness of the neck, swelling of the cheek, toothache, facial paralysis, shortness of breath, great revival point from respiratory arrest

It is important to drink plenty of warm water after the massage, to help clear away toxic substances in our body.

Caution: You should consult with a healthcare professional before practicing Acupressure or starting any diet, exercise, Chinese herbs or other supplementation programs.

By |2016-11-20T04:22:59+00:00October 28th, 2015|Categories: Acupressure, Natural Healing|Tags: |

About the Author:

Hi, I'm Grace Chen. I’m enthusiastic about Traditional Chinese Medicine, natural healing including Chinese Medicinal Herbs, Acupressure, Qi-Gong, foot massage and more. My passion for herbs had been a lifelong journey beginning as a young girl always been fascinated by my grandfather’s Chinese Herbal Medicine chest, full of amazing goodies helping people get well. To chase my dreams, I created a website, HerbalShop.com to share my passion, my grandfather Dr. Chen’s herbal recipes, interesting new and the translation of the classical Chinese herbal formulas with the world. Hope you enjoy it!