Acupressure Massage for Headache, Migraines (Front of the Head)

Activate Our Body's Own Healing Power!

Headache - Migraines Front of the Head - or Forehead and Eyes stomach Headache
Headache - Migraines Front of the Head - or Forehead and Eyes stomach Headache
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These are the acupressure points for headache or migraines – front of the head – or forehead and eyes. Working on these points can help you get better faster. You do not have to use all of these points. Using just one or two of them whenever you have a free hand can be effective.

Acupressure Point ST8 — Tou Wei
Chinese Name: 頭 維

Location: at the corner of the forehead at the junction of the forehead and hairline.
Benefits: migraine headaches, blurred vision and common cold.

Acupressure Point UB2 — Zan Zhu
Chinese Name: 攢竹

Location: on the medial end of the eyebrow, above the inner canthus.
Benefits: headache, blurred vision, failing vision, pain in the supraorbital region, tearing of the eyes, redness of the eyes, swollen eye, pain in the eye, twitching of the eyelids, glaucoma.

Acupressure Point LI20 — Ying Xiang
Chinese Name: 迎 香

Location: at the level of the midpoint of the lateral border of the nostril. in the hollow just outside each nostril.
Benefits: blockages of the maxillary sinuses, sinus headaches, upper respiratory problems, common colds, nasal blockages, shortness of breath, face-lift point.

Acupressure Point Yin Tang
Location: midway between the medial end of the two eyebrows. Use the tip of your thumb or index finger probe the area midway between the medial end of the two eyebrows as indicated on the picture until you feel a slight dip.
Benefits: frontal headache, hyperactivity, adhd, cannot stop thinking, electro-magnetic energy imbalances, jet lag, to control addictions to food, drug, alcohol, smoking etc., to improve psychic ability, reduce mental fog, to improve memory and mental clarity, face lift point, tearing of the eyes.

Acupressure Point GV24 — Shen Ting
Chinese Name: 神庭

Location: on the midline, at the junction of the forehead and the hairline. Directly between your eyebrows in the indentation where the bridge of the nose meets the center of the forehead.
Benefits: frontal headaches, pressure headaches, anxiety, palpitation, insomnia, vertigo, blocked sinuses, failing memory. Stimulates the pituitary gland, which is the master endocrine gland, to enhance the condition of the skin throughout the body.

Acupressure Point GB14 — Yang Bai
Chinese Name: 陽白

Location: with the tip of your index finger probe the area directly up from the pupil of the eye when looking straight ahead, approximately one finger-width above the eyebrow, until you feel a slight dip.
Benefits: headache in the frontal area, pain in and above the eyes, twitching of the eyelids, drooping of the eyelids, glaucoma.

Acupressure Point ST41 — Jie Xi
Chinese Name: 解溪

Location: at the junction of the dorsum of foot and the leg, between the tendons of extensor digitorum longus and halluces longus, approximately at the level of the tip of the external malleolus.
Benefits: edema of the head, edema of the face, dizziness, vertigo, abdominal distention, constipation, clinical depression, rheumatism, ringing in the ear, headaches.

Acupressure Point ST36 — Zu San Li 
Chinese Name: 足三里

Location: Four finger widths below the kneecap toward the outside of the shinbone.
Benefits: Strengthens the whole body to prevent as well as relieve allergies. long life point, balancing point, to boost up energy, knee pain, gastric pain, vomiting, abdominal distention, diarrhea, constipation, dizziness, mental fog, mental disorders, schizophrenia, arterial sclerosis, poor digestion especially of proteins and carbohydrates, diabetes, breast abscess, mastitis, pain and swelling in the breast, side effects of radiation and chemotherapy. Strengthens and tones the muscles and improves the condition of the skin throughout the entire body.

Acupressure Point ST37 — Shang Ju Xu
Chinese Name: 上巨虛

Location: 8 finger width (6 body inch) below the lateral eye of the patella, on the line connecting the eye of the patella and the external malleolus.
Benefits: abdominal bloating, severe constipation, diarrhea, dysentery, appendicitis, cramps in the lower abdomen, knee pain, colitis, irritable bowels.

Acupressure Point LI4 — Hoku
Chinese Name: 合 谷

Location: At the highest spot of the muscle on the back of the hand that protrudes when the thumb and index finger are brought close together. Midway between the thumb and index finger approximately one body inch above the web.
Benefits: Relieves pain and inflammation in the hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder, and neck. Headache, red eye, pain in the eye, nose bleed, toothache, sore throat, facial swelling, fever, abdominal pain, constipation, delayed menstrual cycles, absence of menstruation in fertile women without pregnancy, PMS, delayed labor, to balance the energy in the body, side effects of radiation and chemotherapy in cancer patients

Acupressure Point LI11 — Qu Chi
Chinese Name: 曲池

Location: On the top, outer end of the elbow crease. bend your arm, press your thumb into the hollow located on the top, outer end of the elbow crease, directly above the elbow, between the elbow joint (below) and the muscle (above).
Benefits: food allergy, hives, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery, fever, sore throat, pain in the elbow and arm, tennis elbow, to balance the energy in cancer patients. Relieves allergies, particularly inflamed skin disorders (such as hives and rashes), itching, and fevers.

Acupressure Point CV12 — Zhong Wan
Chinese Name: 中脘

Location: midway between the belly button and the bottom of the breastbone. On the midline of the abdomen, 5 finger width above the belly button.
Benefits: acute abdominal pain, pain due to overeating, gastric pain, sour stomach, belching, regurgitation, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery, distention of the abdomen due to flatulence, hiatal hernia.

It is important to drink plenty of warm water after the massage, to help clear away toxic substances in our body.

Caution: You should consult with a healthcare professional before practicing Acupressure or starting any diet, exercise, Chinese herbs or other supplementation programs.

About the Author:

Hi, I'm Grace Chen. I’m enthusiastic about Traditional Chinese Medicine, natural healing including Chinese Medicinal Herbs, Acupressure, Qi-Gong, foot massage and more. My passion for herbs had been a lifelong journey beginning as a young girl always been fascinated by my grandfather’s Chinese Herbal Medicine chest, full of amazing goodies helping people get well. To chase my dreams, I created a website, HerbalShop.com to share my passion, my grandfather Dr. Chen’s herbal recipes, interesting new and the translation of the classical Chinese herbal formulas with the world. Hope you enjoy it!